Tl;dr (Too Long, Don’t Read)

Tl;drI read an interesting article in the January-February edition of Communications World entitled “Contact Snacking — and What You Can Do About It.”

I wasn’t familiar with the terms “content snacking” or “Tl;dr” until I read this article; however, with increasingly shorter attention spans and a desire for more focused content, it makes a lot of sense.

In case you aren’t familiar, Tl;dr stands for “too long, don’t read” and is most frequently used in online forums, social networks, or when someone sends a URL to a group with the warning that it’s going to be wordy.

If your target audience is looking for quick bits of information, you have to decide whether you want to cater to their needs by providing snack-sized content, whether it’s text, audio or video.

It also means you need to think more strategically about content and determining the critical information you want to share. You want to tell a story that stands on its own but also links to content that adds depth and new dimensions to the material.

Other things to consider:
– Ensure web content stays “above the fold”
– Keep press releases and case studies to two pages
– Keep blogs to 250 to 350 words
– Keep subject lines to 50 characters or less
– Focus your writing and avoid extraneous words — especially on email as more and more email is being read on smart phones

Adapt your message to the media and to your target audience. Get read, create interest so your prospect will reach out and start a dialogue with you.

What are you doing to avoid having your content labeled Tl;dr?

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About Insights From Analytics

Integrated marketing professional who generates insights from analytics to increase revenue. Daily blog now resides at www.insightsfromanalytics.com/blog.
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